freight shipping guide

Freight quotes depend on your shipment’s distance, weight, density, susceptibility to damage, value, and handling ease. When determining your freight quote, a carrier will ask for this information to determine your shipment’s freight classification. A rate table based on distance traveled and freight class determines your shipment price.

LTL and TL Freight Quotes

LTL shipments are priced “per 100 pounds,” “cwt,” or “per hundred weight.” This means that a 400 lb shipment priced at $25 CWT would cost $100, not including accessories or specialty services. Typically, as the weight of your shipment increases the CWT rate decreases. Most freight carriers establish a minimum charge for light shipments. The rate for a full truckload shipment is calculated per mile and is typically cheaper than if it were priced per pound.

Surcharges and Accessories.

Remember, your freight carrier’s rate table will determine the base cost of your freight shipment, but almost all freight haulers add a fuel surcharge to the price of your shipment which can be up to 25 percent. If your item requires special handling or equipment, such as a liftgate or residential delivery, you will be charged an additional fee for these services as well.

 

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Charles Myers

General Manager, Freight Division at uShip.com
Charlie Myers has been in the transport, freight and supply chain since the early 1970’s. He is currently the general manager of uShip freight, where he oversees uShip’s commercial freight initiatives. Before joining uShip. Myers was director of international business development with England Logistics. Myers has also spent six years as president of Getloaded.com and served four years on the Board of Directors at the Transporation Intermediaries Association (TIA). Charlie has also served on the Board of the International Refrigerated Transport Association (IRTA). Myers also worked for 30 years in various roles with the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the Department of Defense’s largest logistics combat support agency and the Interstate Commerce Commission. He is a published writer in the logistics and supply chain field, including two books.

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